Consulting the Cigar Flavor Wheel

almost as good as sex

I started smoking cigars sometime around five years ago.

The catalyst was a D/s cigar play demo put on by a couple, folks I consider to be dear friends.  It was a memorable night.  An evening where I picked up an enjoyable hobby with rituals easily incorporated into a BDSM lifestyle.

It was also my introduction to the “kinky kabin”.  Now, one of my favorite venues for play, it’s a remote cabin about a mile and a half hike from the nearest trailhead.  Some call it “the cabin where no one can hear you scream”, a moniker that’s almost literally true.  But, to me, it will always remain the kinky kabin, a place that’s truly near and dear to my heart.

Cigars are also near and dear to my heart these days.  Call them a guilty pleasure if you will, but do not doubt for a moment that they are a great pleasure to me.  No, it’s not quite as good as sex or BDSM play.  But, it’s not far from being a close second.

differing tobacco flavors

When considering the flavor of a cigar, there are a great number of factors that will combine to affect the smoking experience.

For starters, a vast number of different tobacco varieties are grown around the world.  Each variety has a distinctive flavor it imparts.  Some are inherently spicy or peppery, others smoke much sweeter.  There is a lot of nuances, far more than I can really describe here.  I must also admit, while I’ve studied some plant breeding, I’m relatively ignorant when it comes to tobacco strains.  But, I do know that the particular strain of tobacco used is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to flavor.

The country/region/province/state where the tobacco is grown will be another significant factor, regardless of the strain.  Cuba is famous for cigars because of the growing conditions on the island.  Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Sumatra, Mexico, Brazil, and the United States are the highlights on a short list of places where great cigar tobacco can be grown.  I’ve also smoked cigars that included tasty Italian and Turkish tobaccos.  Climate and soil are the keys to diverse flavors here.

Cuban Flag

Just growing and harvesting the tobacco is an art of its own.  Upper leaves (sun leaves) which absorb the greatest amount of sunlight have a significantly different flavor profile than the lower leaves (shade leaves) from the very same plant.  There are unique names for each different cutting, but that’s more specialized than I’d like to get for today’s topic.  Add to that, there’s even a particular growing technique used to grow tobacco under partial shade, creating a distinctive look and flavor of its own.

flavors, flavors, flavors – decisions, decisions, decisions

Once the tobacco is grown, the art of curing comes into play.  It is during the curing process that the different bundles of tobacco leaves are turned, graded, and sorted a number of times.  Different strains of tobacco are cured, once again, using a variety of methods.  This has another significant impact on the tobacco’s flavor.

Some premium tobaccos spend time inside oak casks and barrels during the curing process.

Others are placed inside special chambers with spices, essential oils, and floral essences, creating a somewhat controversial, but popular, form of “infused” cigar.  Some tobaccos are fermented during the curing process, once again creating flavor variety.

The variations are becoming endless, aren’t they?

Acid Kuba Kuba – an infused cigar

Once the tobacco is cured, another art form comes into play.  Cigars are rarely created with a single kind of tobacco, they are blended with a variety of different leaf.

I don’t wish to get too technical with a confusing array of cigar terms, but one or two seem necessary here.  If all the leaf is used in a cigar was grown in a single country, then the cigar is called a puro.   While puros are a common form of cigar, it’s also common to find cigars blended with tobaccos from a variety of different countries.

rolling, rolling, rolling …

Once the blend of a cigar has been decided upon, then it’s time for the cigar to move into production.  I consider the rolling of cigars to be yet another skilled art.

Cigars are constructed using filler (often themselves a blend) and a binder leaf, all artfully rolled inside an outer leaf called a wrapper.  Wrappers are the most visually appealing leaf, as they are a cigar’s window dressing.  Wrappers are often (but not always) the most dominant leaf in a cigar’s flavor profile.

The cigar’s construction is yet another factor in its ultimate flavor. Cigars are rolled into a pretty wide variety of shapes and sizes, this is called their vitola. In that way, cigars are kind of like cocks. Some are long and thin, others short and stubby. Even with the same blend, each style tastes different too.

Yes, I can guarantee that size matters.  So does shape.  (And yes, I’m talking cigars…) 

Cigar Advisor’s Flavor Wheel

Which brings me, finally, to the point behind this somewhat long-winded opus on cigar flavor.

I obviously have great affection for my cigars.  In relative terms, however, I’m still relatively inexperienced at discerning all the wonderful nuances in a cigar’s flavor.

But, I’m not a total neophyte either.  I once trained, at a 4-star restaurant, to be a chef.  I was expected to be able to detect subtle nuances in food.  You might say that I, at least, have a somewhat discerning palate.

At the same time, I am still learning.  And, that’s where a reference like Cigar Advisor’s Flavor Wheel comes into play.  It’s a great guide.  The Flavor Wheel can help me to be a more discerning cigar consumer.

Feel free to click on the image, or the link (at the bottom of the gray box) in the quote, to get a peek at the full sized flavor wheel image.  Also, know that Cigar Advisor is a wonderful reference, I look for each new article there with great anticipation.  That publication’s sponsor, Famous Smoke Shop is also a great source for quality cigars at very competitive prices.  It’s where I buy mine…

The Cigar Advisor Cigar Flavor Wheel

The cigar flavor wheel – it’s how cigar lovers talk to each other. Are you wondering how to identify and taste the different flavors in your cigar? Or maybe you’ve been reading some cigar reviews, and want to know how the writer sensed certain tastes. With a flavor wheel, anyone can get into cigar tasting, regardless of your experience level.

And that’s why we’ve created this updated cigar tasting wheel…we wanted to give everyone a way to identify and discuss the flavors found in cigars. everyone in the cigar world, from blenders to smokers, uses a flavor wheel – these words provide everybody with a common vocabulary that we can use to discuss specific qualities of the cigars we smoke. You know that a cigar tastes like more than just burning tobacco; the smoke can be characterized by notes of earth, nuts, cream and many more nuances.

How to use our Cigar Flavor Wheel

We didn’t make up these spots on our cigar flavor wheel. They’re all very real, each of them a flavor sensation that either we sensed while reviewing a cigar, or was mentioned in a review by someone whose opinion we trust.

Think of the wheel as a visual glossary of the most-often mentioned cigar flavors, organized into categories – or even more appropriately, families. each color-coded part of the wheel is loaded with words that match up with the qualities you might sense in a smoke. That way, when you try and describe the things you like about your cigar, we can understand more clearly – because we know what those flavors taste like, too.

What the Categories Mean

The primary categories of the cigar flavor wheel are at the center. From there, we break those outward into subcategories. Related categories appear side-by-side, and we’ve color coded the groupings to reflect the feel of each family: green for plants, yellow for spices, etc.

To use this flavor wheel for cigars, fire one up and start at the center – as you smoke, think about the basic flavors you’re sensing. Then you can proceed to narrow down these general observations into more specific flavors, as you move toward the outer rings of the wheel. That way, you can note which cigars have the flavors you like (or the ones that don’t), and discuss your experience with other cigar smokers.

Cigar Flavor Wheel | Famous Smoke

Note – I am not affiliated with Famous Smoke Shop or Cigar Advisor in any way.  The links I’ve provided are for my reader’s convenience only.

Cabin Where No One Can Hear You Scream

Cabin Where No One Can Hear You Scream

Masturbation Monday: Week 154

It’s called “the cabin where no one can hear you scream.”

It’s quite literally true.  I tested it well enough.

Access is a gravel road.  Very rural.  Farm country.

The trail in is gated.

It’s a mile-and-a-half walk to the cabin from a gravel parking lot.

One night I had a submissive named Kay screaming my name at the top of her lungs.  Again.  And again.

She had asked for a cathartic flogging.  I delivered.

With Kay’s hands cuffed overhead, I started to warm her up with a doeskin flogger.  Then, I moved up to up to one with weightier elk tresses.  A thick mop.

That’s when the screaming began.

“Michael….”

“MICHAEL…”

“MICHAEL!!!”

She screamed and screamed.  I paused for a moment.  Moved in close.  I made sure she remembered her safe word.  She did.

I had her say the word.  She growled it at me.  Her look (and sound) was like a feral cat.

I went back to my craft, mixing styles and intensity with the strike of elk hide.

She started screaming again.

“Michael….”

“MICHAEL…”

“MICHAEL!!!”

Almost a screech, it was almost embarrassing.  Well, outside of the fact that the whole spectacle was making my cock hard.

I had Serafina clamp her hand down over the girl’s mouth.  The screams were muffled for a moment.

Only a week before, at an event called Twisted Tryst, Janet Hardy had flogged Kay to orgasm in an Energy Play demo.

It was now my chance to try.  I worked the rhythm steadily.  Florentine flogging.  I was breathing with the tempo.

Visualizing my energy, my chi.  Letting the energy flow through my hand, through my fingertips.  Down the length of the flogger.

I visualized my energy flowing through the elk tresses across Kay’s backside.

As Serafina let go of the lady’s mouth, the screams began again.

Her voice had changed.  The screech was gone. It was a dusky growl now.

No longer was she screaming my name.  Now it was simply… “Please!”

I’m big on requiring orgasm control from any submissive in my service.  The rule is simple, ask for permission before you cum.

She wasn’t begging me for a stronger flogging.  Kay certainly wasn’t begging for the flogging to end.  She was begging to cum.

“Please…”

“PLEASE…”

“PLEASE!!!”

Just one of many true stories from the cabin where no one can hear you scream…

Review – Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Sampler

Review – Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Sampler

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Cigar Samplers Reviewed

Reviewing Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler

While I’ve had a long and checkered relationship with tobacco throughout my life (so far), I’ve only been a cigar smoker since 2013.  So, I’ve not yet found my personal “holy grail” of cigars, if such a thing actually exists.

With that said, I’ve tried my share of different cigar varieties over 2013 and 2014.  I’ve sampled some classic brands like Padron, Ashton, and H Upmann, as well as some of the newer sensations like Diesel, Man of War, and Gurkha.  I’ve even had the “guilty pleasure” of enjoying more than a few tastes of CAO Flavors and Drew Estate Acid infused cigars.

Victor Sinclair Serie '55' Perfecto Sampler FAN - CARTOONIn my search for special cigars that fit my personal taste, I’ve found that samplers are a cost effective way to survey the variety I’m craving as a newer cigar enthusiast.  While samplers can come with their own hazards (often times sample packs are composed of the varieties most needed to be moved by the cigar distributor/retailer rather than what a smoker most wants to experience,) I’ve found many to be excellent purchases.

With that in mind, I’ve started a new series of posts, not featuring individual cigar reviews, (I’m already doing that,) but instead to offer an objective appraisal of the quality to be found in cigar samplers offered for sale on the Internet.  For my initial offering, I’m reviewing a sampler I purchased back in July, the Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler from CigarsInternational.com.

Official Product Description – Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler

Quoting from the sampler’s product page at Cigars International:

Victor-Sinclair-Serie-'55'-Perfecto-Sampler_cigars-international

Product Picture from Cigars International, my source for this sampler.

Fit for a king.

Series ‘55’ is the crowning achievement of Dominican cigarman Jose Dominguez (of Victor Sinclair). The Series ‘55’ is an impressive super-premium featuring 5-year-old tobaccos from 5 different countries. Available in four varieties, Series ‘55’ is normally accompanied by the super-premium price tag. But to entice you into sampling this beauty, Senor Dominguez has crafted a special sampler for his friends at CI. This impressive collection combines four cigars from each of the flavorful ’55’ blends. But wait, it gets better, each cigar is crafted into an intriguing perfecto shape, releasing concentrated layers of intoxicating flavors.

The Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler includes 16 cigars:
4 – Serie ’55’ Blue Maduro Perfecto (5″ x 54)
4 – Serie ’55’ Green Sun Grown Perfecto (5″ x 54)
4 – Serie ’55’ Red Corojo Perfecto (5″ x 54)
4 – Serie ’55’ Yellow Cameroon Perfecto (5″ x 54)

MSRP: $144.00
Current retail price @ Cigars International: $34.95

That all sounds really good, doesn’t it?  Or perhaps the opposite . . . Maybe it just makes you want to laugh?

Cigar ad copy can be very much over the top in some many cases, and seriously folks, nobody says their cigars taste like dog turds.  That’s why websites and blogs reviewing cigars are an integral part of the hobby.  The only way to know if the cigar closely resembles it’s description is to light up!

So, let’s sample the sampler!

Sampling the Cigars

Victor-Sinclair-Serie-'55'-Perfecto-Sampler-posterize

Do they look like bundled dog droppings to you too?

While I’ll leave descriptions of the individual cigars to their own separate reviews, I would like to give some general overall impressions from the sampler.   In addition to how they burn and taste, cigars are rated on a variety of aesthetics.  Unfortunately, that’s where we find the most obvious issues with this sampler.

The first thing that’s obvious upon inspection of the Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler is the uneven surface texture of the individual cigars, they don’t look as nice as many other premium cigars I’ve sampled.  In terms of texture they are also a little soft and spongy, as compared to my experience.  That itself isn’t a huge problem, but it does contribute to the biggest issue I find with the appearance of these cigars.  It’s said that shapes like the Perfecto, which tapers at both the head and foot of the cigar, are more difficult to roll than a standard shape.  That’s all fine and good, but it assumes that cigar rolling is an art form, and these don’t strike me as being a particularly artistic example of a torcedor’s art.

Small bumps and ridges are obvious, not just to the eye, but also to the touch.  While this seems to primarily be an aesthetic problem that doesn’t effect the cigar as it’s smoked, the rough finish might be off-putting to people who demand that their cigars look as refined as they actually taste.  Unfortunately, the double perfecto shape combined with the rough exterior, work together to make these cigars resemble a bundled pack of dog turds.

Another issue I found is the overuse of glue to secure the label.  This has turned into a pet peeve of mine.  At it’s best it’s just sloppy, and at it’s worst it has the potential to ruin a cigar.  If the label sticks to the cigar wrapper instead of itself, even the most careful efforts can result in a torn wrapper and a cigar that simply won’t smoke properly.  Not good . . .

Once cut and lit, the cigars I’ve smoked from this sampler have burned relatively well.  The draw was perhaps a tad bit light, but always at least acceptable.  Each of the four varieties are different blends, so the flavors to be found among the varieties in this sampler are relatively diverse.  My favorites were the Maduro and Corojo, with the Cameroon in third place,  but all were at least acceptable to my personal smoking palate.

While tasty enough, none of the individual cigars were especially complex in terms of flavor, none of these is going to get a 90+ rating from Cigar Aficionado.  That’s OK. Victor Sinclair cigars, while certainly qualifying as premium handrolled cigars, are more affordable than a lot of other alternatives.  As with most things in life, you get what you pay for.  And, while some of the more affordable cigars on the market today are quite good, these are not going to be comparable to Padron 1926 Series retailing at $20 a stick.  Sorry, but that’s just life.

Conclusions – Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Sampler

The MSRP for this sampler bundle of sixteen cigars is $144, so at least in theory these are supposed to be $9 a stick.  At that price, I’d not ever consider purchasing any of the individual cigars in this sampler, nor would I recommend the sampler to anyone.  The current cost at Cigars International is $34.95, or about $2.18 each.  At that price point they are certainly an acceptable value, but perhaps not the greatest to be found on the market today, not so much because of the quality of the tobacco as it’s smoked, but instead because of the aesthetic issues I’ve already detailed.

My actual cost of the sampler was $24.93, picked up back in July at a sale price.  I’m well satisfied with that value.  Heck, at a $1.55 each, I can’t complain at all, it worked out to be a great deal.  Yes, I thought a blend of tobacco’s from five different countries would offer a more complex flavor, no doubt about that.  And, they are far from the most physically attractive cigar I’ve had the pleasure to appreciate.  Still, they are tasty enough little tobacco turds, just not the kind of rich complex flavor I’d sit and appreciate for it’s own experience.

I smoked one of each variety (Cameroon, Corojo, Maduro, and Sun Grown) for this review.  After setting aside a single “best looking” example of the four different blends for individual cigar reviews, I found a good use for the eight that remained – I like to smoke one while I mow my lawn!  Being a five inch perfecto, with a tapered head and foot, the Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’  cigars in this sampler last perhaps a half hour.  Not long enough for a deep conversation with my friend Alpha on the deck of the “Kinky Kabin”, but just about the right timing for a bit of yard work.

Perhaps that’s not the greatest praise I’d ever give to a cigar, but these are not the greatest cigars I’ve managed to enjoy.  For nothing more than six bits per stick, I can afford to burn one while I mow.  In the grand scheme of things that’s not the highest purpose I’ve found for smoking, but it certainly has it’s place.

Victor-Sinclair-Serie-'55'-Perfecto-Sample-single

A perfect illustration of the issues with the cigar’s obviously uneven construction – A Victor Sinclair Serie ’55’ Perfecto Corojo. (photo by Sinnjara Samadhi)

Drew Estate’s Natural Dirt Torpedo | Cigar Review

Drew Estate’s Natural Dirt Torpedo | Cigar Review

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Cigars & BDSM

As I said in my previous cigar review, occasionally enjoying a quality cigar has become a guilty pleasure of mine.

It started last August, when friends ProfCedar and rocketgrl put together a D/s cigar smoking demo.

The rest, as they say, is history.

I now own a pair of humidors.  I smoke three or four cigars in a good week.  In a “bad” week, my consumption could be five or six, especially if there’s lots of thinking to do.

The last long weekend at the kinky kabin I carried in 6 full sized cigars and a dozen smaller sized infused cigars from a pair of CAO Flavours Sampler Boxes.  Yes, there’s lots and lots of thinking to do these days.  That’ll happen with new relationships that are complicated by children, not to mention a spouse, who may become an ex-spouse against his own wishes.

Did I say I had lots of thinking to do?  Ya, I guess I did, and I still do.  What a great excuse time to try a new cigar!

I ♥ Infused Cigars

I recently became an aficionado of infused cigars.  That’s especially true of Drew Estate’s Acid brand of cigars.  

Sure, some folks may not consider an infused cigar to be as “manly” to smoke as a full flavored maduro wrapped long leaf stick.  What could I care?  Dominants like myself aren’t looking to conform as much as we are simply looking to be true to ourselves in light of the weight of societal pressures to do otherwise.  In other words, I’m not smoking to impress anyone, let alone to maintain an image.

So, there’s no doubt that infused cigars are a delicious pleasure of mine.  And, they aren’t even a guilty pleasure.  Obviously, if I’m writing about infused cigars here, I’m not ashamed in any way to say I enjoy them.  Thank you very much!

It started with a gift from Sinnja, who brought a CAO Moonstone infused/flavored cigar to me as a present a few weeks back.  Mellow, subtle, and delicious, I was hooked on the concept.

Who knew that cigars could smell like incense and be welcome in the house?  It might not be true for any others, but that’s certainly true for Drew Estate offerings!

Drew Estate’s Natural Dirt Torpedo (5.0″ x 52)

drew estate natural cigarsDrew Estate’s Natural line of cigars are crafted in Esteli, Nicaragua using Nicaraguan leaf combined with traditional black tobaccos.  Here’s how the line is described at Cigars International:

The Natural cigar line by Drew Estate is a cigar you have to try. Each is handmade in Esteli, Nicaragua with a host of different gourmet long-leaf tobaccos from Syria, Haiti, Turkey, Dominican Republic and St. James Parish. Exceptional draw leading to incomparable flavor. These cigars impart a unique, distinctive taste which you won’t find anywhere else.

The current offerings from Drew Estate Natural, as listed at Cigars International, include:

Big Jucy: an extra-big, extra-juicy, Jucy Lucy
Clean Robusto: 
naturally sweet and rich
Dark Angel: 
a chunky torpedo with a rich, sweet, and complex medium-full flavor.
Dirt: 
black as night; delicately seasoned; hints of mocha
Dirt Torpedo: 
a bigger, dirtier version of the Dirt in a Torpedo size
English: 
medium to full with superior balance in richness and sweetness
Egg: 
an intriguing flavor, aroma, and rabbit-in-a-snake appearance
Jucy Lucy: 
Cameroon wrapper; small size; hint of caramel, smooth
Ltd. Irish Hops: 
dark, rich, creamy, with a sweet finish; complex and medium in body.
Ltd. Pimp Stick: Cameroon wrapper; medium-bodied, major flavor; exotic blend; rich, smooth, subtle
Medusa: a funky culebra offering 3 rich, mocha-filled cigars in one.
“NDB”: 
a 7″x44 lonsdale version of Dirt. Natural Dirt Blend.
Root: 
mocha cappuccino taste; hearty flavors
Root Deluxe: 
a 6″x50 version of the Root that comes individually tubed
Shorty: dark, slightly sweet, and rich. Hints of mocha and chocolate.

drew-estate-dirt-torpedo-06I’ve sampled a few of those offerings, and all have been very nice.  For this review, I’ll be discussing the Natural Dirt Torpedo (5.0″ x 52). I’ve had the pleasure of sampling several of the Natural Dirt Torpedos, and can say without a doubt they are consistently delicious and satisfying.

Here are the official descriptionof the Natural Dirt Torpedo from Drew Estate:

DIRT & DIRT TORPEDO – There really is no choosing between these two stellar smokes, because they both rule. Aromatic black tobaccos with a touch of sweetness get you where ya need to go. And yup!, soon you will be chain smokin’ them.

Of course Cigars International descriptions are also very relevant:

Dirt: black as night; delicately seasoned; hints of mocha
Dirt Torpedo: a bigger, dirtier version of the Dirt in a Torpedo size

Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo | The Review

The Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo I sampled specifically for this review was a rich beauty straight from the wrapper in.  The dark Nicaraguan maduro wrapper is lovely, rough in texture, but not full of veins.  The cap is flavored with more than a subtle hint of sweetness.

Unlike Drew Estate Acid cigars, where the infused nature of the cigar is unmistakable, the Natural Dirt Torpedo is far less flamboyant.  There are hints of coffee and mocha, but it’s certainly subtle.  At first whiff all I got was rich strong tobacco smell.  It was only with a moment of reflection and savoring the complex flavor that I found the coffee and mocha.

The stick lit beautifully with my trusty Moretti Churchill Quad-Flame Lighter.  Despite being toasted outdoors on a windy day, the Natural Dirt Torpedo burnt quite evenly.  I love to see clean white ash on my cigars, unfortunately that’s not always the case with cigars who’s infusion process includes contact with any sugars.

In case you didn’t know, sugar burns harsh and black.  Quite undesirable if you ask me.  Fortunately, the Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo didn’t show the telltale signs of “sugar spray”, even if it did burn to bit of a mottled dingy gray.

Where it really matters, the Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo does not disappoint.  The smoke was rich, smooth, and satisfying.  Bravo!

It was easier to taste the mocha and coffee undertones at the start of the stick.  At the half way point, it seemed the strong dark tobacco’s really overwhelm everything else, at least it was that way for my palate.  The smoke was always creamy, but peppery undertones begin to make the tongue tingle as the cigar burns down.

As is my personal ritual these days, I shared a few draws on the stick with Serafina.  I should probably say something about sucking on whatever stick I offer my sweet slave, tobacco or not, but I digress.  She found the Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo very strong, rich flavored, complex, and heady.  Perhaps that’s more than a little bit like her favorite dominant.

conclusions

It’s not an inexpensive cigar.  A case of 24 Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedos will set a person back a little over $100.  So it’s not exactly an expensive top line cigar either, at least in terms of price.  $4 a stick is a very good price point for these babes, although it’s a little rich for an everyday smoke for some folk.

In terms of flavor and value, I found this cigar to be very good all around.  When I was a cigarette smoker, I tended towards strong Turkish tobacco blends.  So it’s no surprise I favor the rich flavors found in a cigar like the Natural Dirt Torpedo.

It’s not your typical infused cigar.  The Drew Estate Natural Dirt Torpedo will never give Acid cigars a run for their money in terms of exotic aromas.  Instead it offers a very solid tobacco flavor base, with just a hint of delicious infused mocha and espresso goodness.

Very nice!

 photo credits for this post – Sinnja – with her Samsung Galaxy S5 phone

(post phone editing by yours truly – Michael Samadhi)

note – cigars give off carcinogenic smoke when lit and enjoyed – if you want to live forever you are probably reading the wrong blog!

Iced Boobies

Iced Boobies

This entry is part 23 of 35 in the series Sinful Sunday

It was a hot afternoon at the Kinky Kabin,

Sinnja decided Serafina needed to be cooled down with a little bit of ice . . .

The result?

Iced boobies!

iced boobies

ice-play-serafina-and-sinnja

ice-play-serafina-and-sinnja-04

Feeling a little sinful this Sunday – just click on the Sinful Sunday banner and find other delightfully sinful images.

Sinful Sunday